New York

A tour of schools data around the country – California (LA), Denver, Houston

In reflecting on transparency in government, I thought I'd take a look around the country at a few other urban school districts to see how they make data available to the public. Are there school districts out there that are models for all in terms of making data accessible? Today, LA, Denver, and Houston. Tomorrow, DC, Chicago, and Baltimore. If there are other cities you think I should look at, leave a comment. Next week, we'll see what users in each of these cities have to say about the availability of data - if you're from one of the featured cities and can provide perspective, please email me. Also, what tools would be most helpful to you as someone interested in education? In exploring each site, I looked to see what information is available, in what format, how quickly I found it, and whether special tools were available to help me navigate the data and answer my own questions. Please keep in mind that since I'm not from these other cities, I'm a "naive user" of these sites, perhaps similar to a parent or community member interested in but not expert at finding what's out there. If I've missed anything on any of the sites I visited, let me know so I can update this. Screenshot of California's STAR system Starting out west, I spent a few minutes at the LA Unified School District homepage, which relatively quickly led me to the California Department of Education's Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) system, a tool that allows you to search at different levels (county, district, school), by subgroup, and view or download tables of information. Both mean scale scores and the percentage of students at each proficiency level are reported. What's problematic is that to compare subgroups or years, you have to create separate reports for each category you want to compare (e.g., first request 2006 data, then request 2007 data, then compare on your own); the tool would be immensely more powerful if it allowed you to select two or more subgroups or years for comparison. Summary tables comparing different subgroups and different years are available with the 2007 press release, but only for some kinds of data (proficiency statistics are compared but not scale scores, for example).
New York

Parents, community leaders come together around 75 Morton St. middle school plan

New York

On using models, drafts, and peer critiques in the classroom…

I think people are afraid of candor with kids because they feel like they don’t want to fight with them; they don’t want to hurt their feelings; they don’t want to step on them. I think that’s a big mistake. I don’t think clarity and candor means meanness or hurting kids’ feelings. If you can be very specific about what’s working in a piece of work and equally specific about what’s weak, it’s a gift to the student who created it. So says Ron Berger in a thought-provoking interview in UnBoxed, "a journal of reflections on purpose, practice and policy in education" published by the High Tech High Graduate School of Education. Berger, of Expeditionary Learning Schools, thinks student projects should be organized around the concept of "crafting beautiful work," with the teacher using models of excellent work, peer critiques like those practiced in writing and art workshops for adults, and multiple drafts to help students create something truly masterful. Berger says that his ideas were informed by his experiences in the arts and architecture: As a self-employed carpenter I designed homes and additions, and you would never do blueprints for anything without an incredible amount of critique from the homeowners, from engineers, from other builders, from architects. That process of many different iterations of the project and many improvements along the way was the ethic of what we did. And that ethic, of being a craftsman and carpenter and trying to do things really well, certainly spilled over into my sense of what a classroom should be.
New York

The Summer Arts Institute at Stuyvesant High School

Second in a series on free summer opportunities for New York City students. Read the first post about the Manhattan School of Music Summer Music Camp. Vocal music students practicing at SAI. On a recent July morning, in a classroom at Stuyvesant High School in Manhattan, master vocal music teacher Jayne Skoog asked her students to pause. "Put your hand here for a minute," she instructed them, placing her hand on her ribcage. "Put your hand right here." The students placed their hands over their own chests, studying how air should move in and out of their lungs as they sing. Down the hall, Joe Bartolozzi was teaching an advanced music theory class, animatedly illustrating a point about tension and release with a joke about a pianist playing "Amazing Grace" and stopping just before the final, resolving chord. Bartolozzi let his students feel that tension as he finished the story - then played the chord, allowing everyone in the room to experience the release firsthand. Meanwhile, upstairs, students were scattered around teacher Jan Juracek's photography lab. Two worked together at a computer, using Photoshop to merge a student's self-portrait with a photograph of the New York City skyline. Juracek sat nearby, helping another student edit a digital photo. A small group sat sprawled at student desks, flipping through photography books and their own portfolios. On the floor, students assembled what appeared to be a poster-sized contact sheet: they explained that it's a collaborative piece they are creating, bringing together each student's self-portrait on the theme "THE ARTS: A Lens to the City." This theme is shared by the seven studios of the Summer Arts Institute, a free, four-week intensive arts program for New York City public school students entering grades 8-12. In addition to vocal music and photography, the studio programs include instrumental music, dance, drama, visual art, and film.