Check out this story in today’s Washington Post for a data-backed take on the effects of cyber bullying on young people. Ronald J. Iannotti, principal investigator for the study, found that students targeted by cyber-bullies, who may not always identify themselves, “may be more likely to feel isolated, dehumanized or helpless at the time of the attack.” The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health and was based on surveys of more than 7,000 American schoolchildren. Researchers also discovered that traditional bullying and cyber-bullying are not necessarily distinct events. One often flows into the other.

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