The Other 60 Percent

Early education…in the doctor’s office

Stepheny Renteria, six months old, tentatively took the brand new board book from pediatrician Meghan Treitz just as the check-up began. It was called “Dulces Sueños,” or “Sleepy Heads.”

Sitting in her mother’s lap in a sunny exam room at the Child Health Clinic at Children’s Hospital in Aurora, she gazed wide-eyed at the book’s baby faces. She turned it upside down. She brought it to her mouth as if she might take a bite out of it. A few minutes later, she dropped it on the floor.

Stepheny Renteria, who is six months old, takes a new board book from Dr. Meghan Treitz at a Children's Hospital clinic in Aurora.
Stepheny Renteria, who is six months old, looks at a new board book held by Dr. Meghan Treitz at a Children’s Hospital clinic in Aurora.

While Stepheny played with her new book, Dr. Treitz spoke to Stepheny’s mother Maria Giron about the importance of reading, using a phone interpreter to translate her words into Spanish.

It only took a few minutes, but Dr. Treitz and others who hand out free children’s books and reading advice at routine doctor visits through the “Reach Out and Read” program believe it makes a difference for the low-income families it targets.

The same is true of another early childhood program called Colorado Bright Beginnings, which encourages all parents, regardless of income, to talk to, read to and play with their zero to three-year-old children, usually through doctor’s office visits or home visits by volunteers.

As advocates pay more attention to the power of early exposure to language, many of the most well-known programs are far from meeting demand. In Colorado, only a small fraction of young children are served by programs like Early Head Start, Head Start or intensive home-visiting programs.

Programs like Reach Out and Read and Bright Beginnings step into that void with a unique offer: to reduce early literacy deficits at a much lower cost and on a greater scale. Plus, by connecting with so many families at clinics or other medical establishments, both programs capitalize on the fact that during the early years of their children’s lives, many parents have their only contact with trusted professionals in health care settings.

The importance of starting early

It may seem strange that babies would be the focus of school readiness efforts when they are years away from entering a classroom, but there’s lots of evidence to support the idea that the first years of a child’s life are critical to future success.

One often-cited piece of evidence is a book published in 1995 called “Meaningful Differences in the Everyday Experience of Young American Children.” In it, two university professors, Betty Hart and Todd Risley, share findings from their painstaking study examining how and how much parents of difference socioeconomic statuses talk to their babies and toddlers.

A stack of Bright Beginning bags containing books, learning games and parent guides.
A stack of Bright Beginning bags containing books, learning games and parent guides.

“It was an amazing study,” said Treitz.

One of the most jarring results from the research, she said, demonstrated that babies of higher-income parents begin pulling away from the pack in terms of vocabulary size at just 14 months old. Children of working class families pulled away from their low-income peers when they were 22 to 23 months old.

In other words, massive differences in literacy can be traced back to the parent-child banter that takes place before most children celebrate their second birthdays. By four years old, Hart and Risley assert that children of professional parents hear nearly 45 million words compared to about 13 million words for children of low-income parents.

It’s statistics like this that drive programs like Reach Out and Read and Bright Beginnings, as well as others such as Parents as TeachersHIPPY and the Parent-Child Home Program.

Dr. Stephen Berman, chair of general pediatrics at Children’s Hospital and a founding member of the Bright Beginnings board, said the idea behind Bright Beginnings is to give parents and caregivers the tools they need “to lessen the socioeconomic influence on school readiness.”

And while intensive preschool programs such as Head Start attempt to compensate for deficits accumulated in early childhood, they are very expensive relative to programs like Bright Beginnings, he said.

In 2011, only about 16.5 percent of low-income Colorado children aged zero to five were served by Head Start or Early Head Start, according to data from Kids COUNT, an annual report on the well-being of children. In addition, 51 percent of the state’s three- to four-year old children didn’t attend any kind of preschool program between 2009 and 2011.

Low intensity and low cost

At baby Stepheny’s check-up, Treitz spent only a few minutes at the beginning of the appointment talking about the benefits of reading. She explained to Giron that reading to Stepheny would improve her vocabulary and make it easier for her to learn to read. She noted that babies Stepheny’s age are likely to put books in their mouth.

“That’s normal. That’s a six-month-old’s way of getting to know things” said Treitz,who is also an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Colorado.

While Treitz and others hope the impact of those bite-sized Reach Out and Read sessions will last a lifetime, their short-and-sweet nature is part of what makes the program inexpensive and scalable.

All told, Reach Out and Read includes eight to 10 doctor visits in which children get free books and parents get free advice on reading to their children. The cost, which is covered through private grants and donations, is $5 per visit or up to $50 per child over five years. About 86,000 children in 48 of 64 Colorado counties receive new books through the program annually. 

Bright Beginnings, which  can include up to three annual sessions in which parents receive advice and age-appropriate kits containing children’s books, learning games and parent guides, has a similarly modest price tag. It costs about $55 per visit or $165 per child over three years.

Last year, just over half of Bright Beginning sessions took place at medical clinics. About one-third took the form of home visits led by volunteers and the rest occurred in group settings at libraries, museums or other locations.

Christopher Price, chief operating officer at Colorado Bright Beginnings, said the program reached around 19,000 parents and caregivers last year.

Like Reach Out and Read, Bright Beginnings relies on private grants and donations to cover costs. Leaders of both organizations say they don’t anticipate receiving funding from President Obama’s early learning initiative, which proposes a variety of investments in early education efforts.

While the low-intensity aspect of the two interventions are part of what makes them easy to disseminate, there is sometimes skepticism about the impact of  programs that take only about 15 to 45 minutes a year to administer to a family.

Price said his organization must constantly overcome the question: “How much difference can you really make with a single visit?”

New research

Guidelines on Reach Out and Read posted  at the Child Health Clinic at Children's Hospital.
Guidelines on Reach Out and Read posted at the Child Health Clinic at Children’s Hospital.

More than a dozen studies have been done on Reach Our and Read since its creation 24 years ago. They have found that parents served by the program are four times more likely to read aloud to their children and that preschool children served by Reach Out and Read score three to six months ahead of peers who have not participated.

While there have been a few studies on Bright Beginnings and several surveys that generally show positive feedback from participants, the organization continues to seek evidence supporting its model.

“We have validity to what we’re doing,” said Price. “What we need is credibility.”

New studies underway on both Bright Beginnings and Reach Out and Read in collaboration with Children’s Hospital  may strengthen those findings and explore new ways of reinforcing the early intervention message with parents.

Dr. Treitz is just beginning a $15,000 study that will determine whether a video tutorial demonstrating a technique called “dialogic reading” will help parents engage their children in conversations about books.

“You don’t necessarily read every word that’s on the page. It’s kind of a dialogue between the parent and child,” said Treitz. “The more we can get parents to talk to their kids the better.”

The study will examine whether the video is effective in teaching parents of two- to three-year-olds dialogic readings skills.

The goal, Treitz said, is to “take Reach Out and Read to the next level.”

“[Treitz’s] research, I know for a fact, it will impact our clinics across Colorado, but we’ll share that nationally as well,” said Megan Wilson, executive director of Reach Out and Read Colorado.

Osvaldo Narvaez-Huerta, two, looks at his new book while Dr. Meghan Treitz looks on.
Osvaldo Narvaez-Huerta, two, looks at his new book while Dr. Meghan Treitz looks on.

Wilson noted that because Reach Out and Read occurs in a health care setting, “we have unprecedented access to children…and also the parents themselves.”

She cited a Colorado Trust brief stating that while 90 percent of children ages five and under go to the doctor for preventive care, less than 30 percent are in a child care setting, the next most common contact with a “formal service system.”

Dr. Maureen Cunningham, co-investigator on a planned study of 2,000 Aurora and Denver children in Bright Beginnings, agreed that doctors’ offices are an ideal vehicle for disseminating early learning materials.

“Everybody brings their child to the doctor,” said Cunningham, a primary care research fellow at Children’s Hospital.

Dr. Cunningham and Dr. Berman are collaborating on the Bright Beginnings study, which will pilot an effort to reinforce the program’s face-to-face parent interactions with text messaging and social networking.

For example, researchers may include daily text messages reminding parents to read with their children or suggesting learning games from the Bright Beginnings kits, which come in brightly colored cloth bags. They may also organize “virtual playgroups” of six to eight moms with babies the same age who will share their experiences with Bright Beginnings games and books through online posts or photos.

The additions “will speak the language of young moms,” said Dr. Berman.

The study will initially target families with children in the 12-24 month age range, with follow ups into their school-age years.

Dr. Berman said the study will help answer the question, “Can we strengthen the ability to change parent behavior?”

Price said if the study by Dr. Berman and Dr. Cunningham goes as planned, it will provide indisputable evidence that the effects of early disadvantages can be eliminated with a program that costs around $150 per child

“Where else are you going to get that impact with so little cost?” he asked. “We can change the world with that.”

Coverage of early literacy is supported in part by a grant from Mile High United Way. EdNews Colorado retains sole editorial control over the content of this coverage.

 

Frequently asked

There are lots of ways schools teach English learners. Here’s how it works.

PHOTO: Andy Cross/The Denver Post
Lindsey Erisman works with 6-year-old students in an English Language Acquisition class at Denver's Cole Arts & Science Academy.

School district officials in Westminster this year signed an agreement with federal officials to change how they educate students who are learning English as a second language.

Similar agreements have also shaped how districts in Denver, Aurora, Adams 14, and Adams 12 educate their English language learner students. But many people, including parents and district insiders, may still have questions about the various complicated programs and requirements.

Although many of the language-education agreements are years old, most of the issues haven’t been resolved. In Adams 14, for instance, parents and advocates have protested a district decision to stop biliteracy programming, and have questioned the district’s compliance with its agreement to better serve English learners. District officials have pointed out that their obligation is teaching students English, not making them bilingual.

Now at least one charter school, KIPP, is looking to fill in that programming gap. Many other states have had a number of biliteracy and other bilingual programs at various schools for years, but Colorado has only more recently started to follow those trends.

So what’s the difference between the various language programs and services? And what is required by law and what isn’t? The following questions and answers might help clarify some of those questions as you follow the news around these issues.

Which students are designated as English language learners? Do parents get to decide, or do schools decide?

Federal guidance requires school districts have some way to identify English learners. Most commonly, districts survey all parents at school registration about their home language and the student’s first language. If that survey finds there might be an influence of another language at home, the student must be assessed to determine fluency in English. While the district has to identify all students who aren’t fluent in English as language learners, parents in Colorado can choose to waive the federally required services for their children. If so, the district doesn’t have to provide special services, but would still be required to monitor that the student is making progress toward acquiring English.

What educational rights do English language learners have?

English language learners have specific rights under the Lau v. Nichols Supreme Court case from 1974 and the subsequent Castañeda standards released in 1981. State laws also outline some requirements for school districts. Specifically, school districts must provide programs for all identified language learners to give them the opportunity to learn English and to access a comprehensive curriculum. The government does not state what that program should be, but provides some standards requiring that any program is theoretically sound and has a research base to support it. The program has to have qualified teachers, and a way to demonstrate that students are making progress in learning English and their academic content. While the civil rights officials consider many details to verify compliance, simply put, school districts have the legal obligation to identify students, serve them in a sound program, and monitor their progress.

What is the difference between bilingual education and “ELL services?”

Bilingual education (which is the program that has the most support for efficacy from the research community) offers students opportunities to learn in their native language while they are learning English. Bilingual programs can vary from short-term, or early-exit programs, to more longer-term developmental programs.

English language learner services do not need to provide opportunities for students to learn in the native language. Most commonly these services only offer English language development classes (generally 45 minutes per day). All other content instruction is offered only in English. ELL services are not bilingual.

What is English language development?

English language development must be a part of any program or model a district or school adopts. It is the class time when students are taught the English language. The government wants to see that English learners are given a dedicated time to learn English, when they are not competing with native English speakers. That means, often, English language development is offered as a time when students are pulled out of class to practice English, or as a special elective period students must take without their English-speaking peers.

The structure of this time period, who has access to it, or who teaches it, are areas commonly cited as problems by the federal Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights.

Do students who are identified as English language learners retain that designation forever? What does it mean to be an “exited ELL?”

They’re not supposed to. Students who are English learners should be tested at least once a year to determine their English proficiency. When a student reaches a high enough level, school staff must determine if the student is now fluent in English. If so, the student becomes an “exited ELL.” The law requires districts to monitor for two years students who have exited and are no longer receiving services. There are, however, students who do not reach English fluency before graduating or leaving school.

What is the difference between being bilingual and being biliterate?

Bilingual generally refers to oral language in that bilingual people can understand and speak two languages but may not be able to read and write in those languages. Biliterate refers to being able to understand, speak, read, and write in two languages. Many people are bilingual but not biliterate. Biliteracy is considered to be a higher form of bilingualism.

What is the difference between dual language and biliteracy models?

Dual language and biliteracy models share many common components. Both models usually have biliteracy as their end goal for students. Dual language models may be “one-way” or “two-way.” One-way programs generally serve students who are designated as English language learners (also sometimes called emerging bilinguals). Two-way dual language programs include students who are native English speakers. The only major difference is that biliteracy models focus on using two languages in the language arts or literacy classes (reading and writing in two languages) whereas dual language focuses on using two languages across the entire school day’s curriculum.

What is an immersion model?

Immersion models traditionally are thought of as referring to programs primarily intended for students from the dominant language population to learn a second language. This is different from programs meant to teach English.

While native English students can choose whether or not to learn a second language, students who are English language learners do not have a choice in learning English.

What is sheltered instruction?

This type of instruction takes place in non-dual language schools, during regular content classes (such as math or science), and it’s one way schools try to make the content understandable to students who aren’t yet fluent in English.

This is especially common in schools where English learners speak a variety of languages. Crawford Elementary in Aurora, for instance, has had up to 35 different languages represented among its approximately 560 students. If there aren’t enough students who speak a common first language and also a teacher who speaks the same language as those students, then schools must teach through English, while making the English as accessible as possible.

In practice, this means an English-speaking teacher would use sheltered instruction techniques to help all children understand the lessons such as, physical props, a focus on building vocabulary, and sentence stems.

Denver designates schools as TNLI schools. What does that mean?

Denver created the TNLI label in 1999 to set the district apart from other bilingual program models. TNLI stands for Transitional Native Language Instruction. The Denver TNLI program is a transitional bilingual education program model with a label created just for Denver. It’s a model where the native language is used to help students learn while they’re acquiring English, but still has a goal of making students fluent in English as soon as possible, at which point students move into mainstream English classrooms.

Is one of these models best suited for English learners?

Among researchers, it is commonly accepted that dual language or biliteracy models are the most effective to put English learners on par with their native speaking peers, in the long run.

Why do teachers have to be trained specifically to teach this population of students? What are teachers learning?

Educators and researchers say that teachers need to learn the differences and similarities between learning in one language and learning bilingually. Teachers need to learn about literacy methodology and how teaching literacy in Spanish (for example) is the same and different as teaching literacy in English. They have to learn how to teach English language development to students who are beginning to learn English (it is different than just teaching in English). These trainings also help teachers learn about cultural similarities and differences and about sources of culture conflict. Teachers need to be able to teach children English; how to use English to learn; and how the English language works. In bilingual settings teachers need to learn those three things for two languages. In short, the training needed to be a bilingual teacher is quite different. Colorado will soon require some of this training for all teachers.

What are the challenges districts have in offering these different programs? How do schools decide which type of model to offer?

The demographics of a district’s student population, and district politics play a large part in helping a district decide what model or program to use. Resources can also be a factor in deciding how to structure services or what programs to offer. In Adams 14, when the district leadership decided to pause the roll out of a biliteracy program, the district cited a lack of qualified bilingual teachers, among other things.

In Westminster, the school district’s unique competency-based approach, which removes grade levels and seeks to personalize instruction, was cited as a reason why the district had structured its English language development the way it had before the investigation by the Office for Civil Rights sought to change it.

Does Colorado provide guidance or oversight for how districts are doing this work?

The Colorado Department of Education offers some guidance for districts, but oversight of the districts’ compliance with what is required is limited. In practice, when parents suspect their children aren’t educated well, they have filed complaints with the federal government. In Denver, the complaints went through the Department of Justice. Investigations of most other metro-area districts have been conducted by the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights.

task force

Jeffco takes collaborative approach as it considers later school start times

File photo of Wheat Ridge High School students. (Photo by Nic Garcia/Chalkbeat)

The Jeffco school district is weighing pushing back start times at its middle and high schools, and the community task force set up to offer recommendations is asking for public input.

Nearby school districts, such as those in Cherry Creek and Greeley, have rolled out later start times, and Jeffco — the second largest school district in Colorado — in December announced its decision to study the issue.

Thompson and Brighton’s 27J school districts are pushing back start times at their secondary schools this fall.

The 50-person Jeffco task force has until January to present their recommendations to the district.

Supporters of the idea to start the school day later cite research showing that teenagers benefit from sleeping in and often do better in school as a result.

Jeffco is considering changing start times after parents and community members began pressing superintendent Jason Glass to look at the issue. Middle and high schools in the Jeffco district currently start at around 7:30 a.m.

The task force is inviting community members to offer their feedback this summer on the group’s website, its Facebook page, or the district’s form, and to come to its meetings in the fall.

Katie Winner, a Jeffco parent of two and one of three chairs of the start times task force, said she’s excited about how collaborative the work is this year.

“It’s a little shocking,” Winner said. “It’s really hard to convey to people that Jeffco schools wants your feedback. But I can say [definitively], I don’t believe this is a waste of time.”

The task force is currently split into three committees focusing on reviewing research on school start times, considering outcomes in other districts that have changed start times, and gathering community input. The group as a whole will also consider how schedule changes could affect transportation, sports and other after school activities, student employment, and district budgets.

Members of the task force are not appointed by the district, as has been typical in district decision-making in years past. Instead, as a way to try to generate the most community engagement, everyone who expressed interest was accepted into the group. Meetings are open to the public, and people can still join the task force.

“These groups are short-term work groups, not school board advisory committees. They are targeting some current issues that our families are interested in,” said Diana Wilson, the district’s chief communications officer. “Since the topics likely have a broad range of perspectives, gathering people that (hopefully) represent those perspectives to look at options seems like a good way to find some solutions or ideas for positive/constructive changes.”

How such a large group will reach a consensus remains to be seen. Winner knows the prospect could appear daunting, but “it’s actually a challenge to the group to say: be inclusive.”

For now the group is seeking recommendations that won’t require the district to spend more money. But Winner said the group will keep a close eye on potential tax measures that could give the district new funds after November. If some measure were to pass, it could give the group more flexibility in its recommendations.