School Closings

Closing Indianapolis high schools? Parents and alumni plead ‘slow down’

PHOTO: Dylan Peers McCoy
Many Indianapolis Public Schools parents and alumni were frustrated with the districts proposal to close three high schools.

An effort to ease tensions fell flat at Indianapolis Public Schools’ first public meeting about its plan to close three high schools.

“I think that we can all agree that under our new leadership team, with Dr. (Lewis) Ferebee at the helm, the district has actually made great strides both academically, operationally and financially,” said Denise Herd, the communications consultant brought in to moderate.

“Wouldn’t you all agree?” she said.

“No!” the crowded audience responded in near unison.

That rebuke set the tone for the meeting Wednesday night, where a crowd of about 150 people packed into a room at the Glendale Library to discuss a proposal to close three high schools in the district. IPS educators, parents, alumni and students spoke about frustration with the school closing process, the current administration and charter schools that draw students from the district.

The conversation was highly structured, with attendees divided into several groups to discuss the proposal. District staff, including Ferebee, and school board members moved among the groups, answering questions and listening in on conversations. But the crowd was so lively in its discussion, it was a struggle to hear people over the din of the packed room.

When group leaders shared their thoughts with the full audience after nearly an hour of conversation, the tone was frustrated. Most of the groups agreed that the process was moving too fast and didn’t include enough community input.

“School closings are huge in our community, and so what we need to do is make sure that we have the community involved,” said Carrie Harris of the Crispus Attucks High School Alumni Association. “Let’s not rush this thing.”

PHOTO: Dylan Peers McCoy
Carrie Harris, right, was one of several Indianapolis Public Schools alumni who criticized the district proposal to close three high schools.

The meeting was the first of four the district plans on holding before the administration recommends in June which schools to close. The board is expected to vote on the proposal in September, with schools likely closing in 2018-2019. If the board goes forward with the plan to close three schools, the district would educate just over 5,000 students in the four remaining high schools — a shift that officials project would save the district more than $4 million per year.

Curtis Baker, a Broad Ripple High School graduate and parent, said that he understands the district needs to close schools because of low enrollment, but he wants to know how the money it saves would be used to improve education for students in the high schools that remain open.

“I think we’re kind of rushing this,” he said. “Maybe we’re bleeding money out, and I’m sure we are. But this is affecting a lot of people.”

Many of the audience members said they had deep loyalty to the IPS high schools they and their family attended. Cynnie Halsmer graduated from Broad Ripple High School, along with her mother and two sons. Her two daughters are currently enrolled at the school.

“Slow down,” she said. “Don’t do this to people.”

The district will hold three more community meeting before the administration recommends which high schools to close.

6-8 p.m. May 1
Ivy Tech Culinary Center
2820 N. Meridian Street

6-8 p.m. May 11
Zion Hope Baptist Church
5950 E 46th Street

6-8 p.m. May 15
Haughville Library
2121 W. Michigan St.

new year

Here are the Memphis schools opening and closing this school year

PHOTO: Laura Faith Kebede
Alcy Elementary Schools is being demolished this summer to make way for a new building on the same property that will also house students from Charjean and Magnolia elementary schools.

Six schools will open and six will close as the new school year begins next month.

This year’s closures are composed mostly of charter schools. That’s a shift from recent years — about two dozen district-run schools have shuttered since 2012. All of the schools opening are charter schools, bringing the district’s total to 57, which is more than half of the charter schools statewide.

Below is a list of closures and openings Chalkbeat has compiled from Shelby County Schools and the state-run Achievement School District.

Schools Opening

  • Believe Memphis Academy is a new college preparatory charter school that will focus on literacy while serving students in fourth and fifth grade, with plans to expand to eighth grade.
  • Crosstown High School will focus on creating student projects that solve problems of local businesses and organizations. The school will start with 150 ninth-graders and will be housed in a building shared with businesses and apartments in Crosstown Concourse, a renovated Sears warehouse.
  • Freedom Preparatory Academy will open its fifth school starting with middle schoolers. It will eventually expand to create the Memphis network’s second high school in the Whitehaven and Nonconnah communities.
  • Memphis Business Academy will open an elementary school and a middle school in Hickory Hill. The schools were originally slated to open in 2017, but were delayed to finalize property and financing, CEO Anthony Anderson said.
  • Perea Elementary School will focus on emotional health and community supports for families living in poverty. District leaders initially rejected its application, but school board members approved it. They liked the organization’s academic and community work with preschoolers in the same building.

Schools Closing

  • Alcy Elementary School will be demolished this summer to make room for a new building. It is expected to open in 2020 with students from Charjean and Magnolia elementary schools.
  • Du Bois High School of Arts and Technology and Du Bois High School of Leadership and Public Policy will close. The charter network’s founder, Willie Herenton, a former Memphis school superintendent, said in April the schools are closing because of a severe shortage of qualified teachers.
  • GRAD Academy, part of the Achievement School District, announced in January the high school would close because the Houston-based charter organization could not sustain it. It was the third school in the district to close since the state-run district started in 2012.
  • Legacy Leadership Academy is closing after its first year because the charter organization lost its federal nonprofit status, and enrollment was low.
  • Manor Lake Elementary is closing to merge with nearby Geeter Middle School because low enrollment made for extra room in their buildings. The new Geeter K-8 will join eight others in the Whitehaven Empowerment Zone, a neighborhood school improvement program started by Vincent Hunter, the principal of Whitehaven High School.

School Closings

Memphis charter school signs lease within district boundaries, allowing it to stay open

PHOTO: Jacinthia Jones
The Bartlett storefront Gateway University High School used for the 2017-18 school year.

A Memphis charter school on the brink of closure over the location of its building has signed a lease within Shelby County Schools’ boundaries.

Gateway University High School will move into Holy Nation Church of Memphis on Brownsville Road near Craigmont High School after being in a Memphis suburb since opening in August 2017, according to a spokeswoman for the charter school.

In response, Shelby County Schools will pull its recommendation to revoke the school’s charter, according to the school board’s agenda. The district had called for the school’s closure because of a new state law that prohibits charter schools operating outside of the authorizing district’s limits.

The Tennessee Department of Education gave school leaders until July 1 to comply with an attorney general’s opinion issued in September and to comply with the school’s contract that stated it would operate “within the local school district of Shelby County, Tennessee.” Their previous building was a storefront in Bartlett.

The board was set to vote on the matter Tuesday — five days before the state’s deadline.