Changing History

State aims to close Common Core social studies gap with new curriculum

PHOTO: Maura Walz
A social studies class at New Design High School, where Scott Conti is principal

A two-year effort to reshape the state’s social studies curriculum is nearing its final phase. Like many historical shifts, this one has been fitful, messy, and fraught with tension.

For the first time in 15 years, the state has revamped its outline of the social studies skills and information that students should learn in each grade. Meanwhile, the state hopes to split a two-year survey of world history into two high school courses, which could drastically reduce the content on the related test — currently the most failed of the exams required for graduation.

The state’s Board of Regents is expected to vote on the course split and the new instructional roadmap in March.

The new guidelines, which follow earlier overhauls of math and English, incorporate parts of the Common Core learning standards. But while the guidelines have evolved substantially, some educators say they still do not adhere to the Common Core’s less-is-more ethos. Meanwhile, questions about the shape of future social studies tests and teaching materials have yet to be settled.

“We’re trying to create a document that will last awhile,” which specifies what students should learn while leaving them space to explore, said Steven Goldberg, chairman of an advisory panel that helped review and revise the guidelines. “It’s a tall order.”

Social studies 2.0

The state decided to retool its social studies curriculum soon after it adopted the Common Core math and English standards in 2010.

While the Common Core only offer reading and writing skills for social studies, the state hoped to apply the “fewer, clearer, and higher” philosophy of those standards to the social studies curriculum it has used since 1999. The result was a totally new document, called the New York State Common Core Social Studies Framework.

The framework fuses the Common Core’s literacy standards for social studies with New York’s five existing social studies standards: United States history, world history, geography, economics, and civics. And it overhauls how the standards are fleshed out and presented.

The current curriculum lists the myriad information students must learn bullet point-style. But the framework groups that content into major themes (no more than 12 per grade), followed by smaller concepts and case studies framed as student actions.

For example, a current global history unit on the ancient world simply states, “Expansion of Christianity, Islam, Confucianism, and Buddhism,” then lists some related questions. The new framework offers a paragraph-length theme about the rise of belief systems and a concept about their purpose, then asks students to “identify the place of origin, compare and contrast the core beliefs and practices, and explore the sacred texts and ethical codes” of seven such systems.

The framework also describes the literacy and critical-thinking skills that social studies requires, such as chronological reasoning and analyzing evidence. It draws from the Common Core standards (which outline literacy skills for social studies and other subjects) and the “C3 Framework,” which a coalition of states and national organizations designed to fill the Common Core’s social studies gap. New York was not part of the C3 group but borrowed from its approach to social studies, which favors high-level questioning (“Was the American Revolution revolutionary?”) over rote memorization.

The new roadmap “allows us to re-imagine social studies as a 21st-century discipline,” Greg Ahlquist, New York’s 2013 Teacher of the Year and a member of the framework advisory panel, said in an email. It “prepares students to be critical thinkers and … investigators and interpreters of the evidence.”

Cue the critics

The state education department hired a team of writers in 2011 to rework the social studies curriculum. That original group was led by Natasha Vasavada, an official at the College Board who was part of the team that wrote the Common Core standards.

The state also formed an unpaid advisory panel of about 20 teachers and academics from around the state to review the new framework and make revisions.

Even as they revamped the curriculum, some participants felt they had not gone far enough.

One of the writers, Sandra Schmidt, said her team tried to rearrange American history into socially themed units for the middle school grades and politically themed units for high school based on the argument that such a sequence would better suit students’ interests and abilities at those ages. But they were rebuffed, she said, because the state had decided that each grade would continue to focus on the same general topic (for example, the Eastern Hemisphere in 6th grade).

A panelist, William Gaudelli, said he tried lobbying for less content and more depth, but decided that the state mainly wanted to repackage the same material into a clearer format.

“It was always, ‘Take this old wine and put it into new vessels,’” said Gaudelli, a social studies professor at Columbia University’s Teachers College, who resigned from the panel in protest after one year.

When drafts were released in late 2012 and early 2013, some educators also criticized the framework. They said it packed in too much material, offered some clear-cut interpretations of complex historical events, and gave teachers too few choices.

The revised framework, which was released in December and is open for public comment through Monday, tries to address many of those critiques.

Some concepts were rephrased to force students to do the historical interpreting, and others were restructured to allow teachers to choose which case studies to teach. While the many “Students will” statements were added to offer more guidance, the number of concepts was reduced, according to Ahlquist.

“The work was constantly focused on narrowing the scope and trying to add depth,” he said.

But others say that problems remain.

David Sherrin, a social studies teacher at Harvest Collegiate High School, said the framework’s 10 9th-grade units would require a half-semester each if students were given time to explore documents, read historical biographies, and debate, as Sherrin argues they should be. (His school has asked to receive a waiver freeing it from most of the state tests.)

“All of these things are wonderful to teach,” he said, “but they can’t all be taught.”

Kathy Swan, a University of Kentucky professor and lead writer of the C3 Framework, praised New York’s framework for describing the C3’s “inquiry arc,” a social studies model that guides students from asking questions to taking action. But she added that the framework contains so much historical material, it leaves students little time to pore over photographs, interview sources, create documentaries, or do other projects that mirror the work of actual social scientists.

“The breadth of curricular content currently outlined in the New York frameworks could limit the ability of teachers to go in depth,” Swan said in an email.

Coming soon

After several months of discussion, the framework group decided to split the 9th and 10th grade world history courses at the year 1750. Freshmen would study the first civilizations to the transatlantic slave trade, while sophomores would cover 18th-century empires to the present.

Under the state’s proposal, the Global History and Geography test — one of the five Regents exams required for graduation and the only one to cover two year’s worth of material — could assess only the 10th grade content. That change would lop thousands of years of history off the test. (The Regents could also decide to keep the two-year test structure or test after each year, but those options are considered unlikely.)

Several framework advisors said work on the new assessments will not begin until after the Board of Regents approves the framework. But they added that, if that happens in March, new Global History and United States History tests could be ready by 2017.

The state has also promised to release a “field guide” this spring to help educators implement the new social studies guidelines. This could include primary-source documents, model lessons, and instructional tips for each grade level.

But undoubtedly many teachers will be most interested in the new exams.

Several people suggested the College Board’s redesigned Advanced Placement U.S. History course and exam could serve as a model.

The new course shifts from a list of content to historical thinking skills, themes, and concepts students must learn. Beginning in 2015, the exam format will also change. For example, there will be about half as many multiple-choice questions, which will come in sets grouped around “stimulus material,” such as historical documents or a historian’s argument.

Nick Lawrence, a lead social studies teacher at East Bronx Academy for the Future, a joint middle and high school, said the shape of the revamped Regents tests may prove more powerful than the wording of the framework.

“Our teachers are going to look to that exam for guidance,” he said. “And if it doesn’t reflect the new standards, then they’re not going to change their practice.”

Weekend Reads

Need classroom decor inspiration? These educators have got you covered.

This school year, students will spend about 1,000 hours in school —making their classrooms a huge part of their learning experience.

We’re recognizing educators who’ve poured on the pizazz to make students feel welcome. From a 9th-grade “forensics lab” decked out in caution tape to a classroom stage complete with lights to get first graders pumped about public speaking, these crafty teachers have gone above and beyond to create great spaces.

Got a classroom of your own to show off? Know someone that should be on this list? Let us know!

Jaclyn Flores, First Grade Dual Language, Rochester, New York
“Having a classroom that is bright, cheerful, organized and inviting allows my students to feel pride in their classroom as well as feel welcome. My students look forward to standing on the stage to share or sitting on special chairs to dive into their learning. This space is a safe place for my students and we take pride in what it has become.”

Jasmine, Pre-K, Las Vegas, Nevada
“My classroom environment helps my students because providing calming colors and a home-like space makes them feel more comfortable in the classroom and ready to learn as first-time students!”

 

Oneika Osborne, 10th Grade Reading, Miami Southridge Senior High School, Miami, Florida
“My classroom environment invites all of my students to constantly be in a state of celebration and self-empowerment at all points of the learning process. With inspirational quotes, culturally relevant images, and an explosion of color, my classroom sets the tone for the day every single day as soon as we walk in. It is one of optimism, power, and of course glitter.”

Kristen Poindexter, Kindergarten, Spring Mill Elementary School, Indianapolis, Indiana
“I try very hard to make my classroom a place where memorable experiences happen. I use songs, finger plays, movement, and interactive activities to help cement concepts in their minds. It makes my teacher heart so happy when past students walk by my classroom and start their sentence with, “Remember when we…?”. We recently transformed our classroom into a Mad Science Lab where we investigated more about our 5 Senses.”

 

Brittany, 9th Grade Biology, Dallas, Texas
“I love my classroom environment because I teach Biology, it’s easy to relate every topic back to Forensics and real-life investigations! Mystery always gets the students going!”

 

Ms. Heaton, First Grade, Westampton, New Jersey
“As an educator, it is my goal to create a classroom environment that is positive and welcoming for students. I wanted to create a learning environment where students feel comfortable and in return stimulates student learning. A classroom is a second home for students so I wanted to ensure that the space was bright, friendly, and organized for the students to be able to use each and every day.”

D’Essence Grant, 8th Grade ELA, KIPP Houston, Houston, Texas
“Intentionally decorating my classroom was my first act of showing my students I care about them. I pride myself on building relationships with my students and them knowing I care about them inside and outside of the classroom. Taking the time to make the classroom meaningful and creative as well building a safe place for our community helps establish an effective classroom setting.”

 

Jayme Wiertzema, Elementary Art, Worthington, Minnesota
“I’m looking forward to having a CLASSROOM this year. The past two years I have taught from a cart and this year my amazing school district allowed me to have a classroom in our school that is busting at the seams! I’m so excited to use my classroom environment to inspire creativity in my students, get to know them and learn from their amazing imaginations in art class!”

 

Melissa Vecchio, 4th Grade, Queens, New York
“Since so much of a student’s time is spent inside their classroom, the environment should be neat, organized, easy to move around in but most of all positive. I love to use a theme to reinforce great behavior. I always give the students a choice in helping to design bulletin boards and desk arrangements. When they are involved they take pride in the classroom, and enjoy being there.”

moving forward

After Confederate flag dispute at Colorado football game, schools pledge to bring students together

PHOTO: Marc Piscotty
Manual High students.

Acknowledging “we may never have a conclusive picture of what happened,” two Colorado school districts sought to move past a controversy over whether a Confederate flag was displayed at a football game and open a conversation between the two school communities.

The principal of Manual High, Nick Dawkins, wrote in a community letter over the weekend that the visiting Weld Central High School team “displayed a Confederate flag during the first quarter of the (Friday night) game, offending many members of the Manual community.”

Officials from Denver Public Schools and Weld County School District Re-3J released a joint letter Tuesday saying that based “on what we have learned to date, however, the Weld Central team did not display the Confederate flag.” At the same time, it said, multiple Manual eyewitnesses “reported seeing spectators who attempted to bring a Confederate flag into the game and clothing with flag images.”

Going forward, students from the two schools — one rural and one urban — will participate in a student leadership exchange that has student leaders visit each other’s schools and communities to “share ideas and perspectives,” the letter says.

“At a time in our country when so many are divided, we want our students instead to come together, share ideas and learn together,” says the letter, which is signed by the principals of both schools and the superintendents of both school districts.

The alleged incident took place at a time when issues of race, social injustice, politics and sports are colliding in the United States, making for tough conversations, including in classrooms.

Weld Central’s mascot is a Rebel. Manual, whose mascot is the Thunderbolts, is located in one of Denver’s historically African-American neighborhoods.

Dawkins in his initial community letter also said “the tension created by the flag led to conflict on and off the playing field,” and that three Manual players were injured, including one who went to the hospital with a leg injury. He also said some Manual players reported that Weld Central players “taunted them with racial slurs.”

Weld Central officials vehemently denied that their team displayed the flag. In addition, they said in their own community letter they had “no evidence at this point that any of our student athletes displayed racially motivated inappropriate behavior.”

They said district officials “do not condone any form of racism,” including the Confederate flag.

Weld Central fans told the Greeley Tribune that they didn’t see any Confederate flag.

Read the full text below.