action alert

After New York City teachers push for paid family leave, union takes up the fight

PHOTO: Alex Zimmerman
United Federation of Teachers President Michael Mulgrew, right, says the union is negotiating with Mayor Bill de Blasio, center, for a paid family leave policy.

After a pair of Brooklyn high school teachers launched a campaign to demand that New York City teachers get paid family leave, their union is now joining the fight.

On Friday, the United Federation of Teachers sent an “action alert” to its members, calling on the city to provide paid leave — at no additional cost to teachers. After years of negotiating behind the scenes, the union is now going public with its demands and calling on parents to share their stories about how the policy has impacted their families.

“The city’s current parental leave policy forces members to choose between their own children and their profession,” the union’s action alert email reads. “It’s time that the city grants UFT members the paid parental leave they deserve.”

The campaign follows a teacher-led push that included a viral petition and speeches at a recent union meeting. Emily James and Susan Hibdon, both teachers and mothers, started an online petition demanding paid leave that has garnered more than 81,000 signatures. The women also took their cause to the union president.

“We dedicate our lives to taking care of other people’s children; we become second mothers to them,” James said in a speech at a recent union meeting. “But when it comes time for us to do the bare minimum for our own children, the system forgets us.”

Under the city’s current policy, only birth mothers are allowed to take time off after having a baby. Even then, they have to use their sick time, which is limited to six weeks after a vaginal delivery or eight weeks after a C-section. Adoptive parents and fathers can take up to 12 weeks off under federal law, but the city provides no pay during that time.

Meanwhile, Mayor Bill de Blasio extended paid family leave to 20,000 non-unionized government employees in December 2015. But the move didn’t apply to city workers in unions, and the benefit came at the cost of a scheduled raise for managers and fewer leave days for veteran employees. No public-sector unions currently offer paid leave.

PHOTO: United Federation of Teachers
The Uniter Federation of Teachers has launched a public campaign to demand paid family leave for its members.

In an interview with Chalkbeat Monday, UFT President Michael Mulgrew called the teachers’ petition and speeches “very helpful” in drawing attention to the issue. He added that the union has been trying to negotiate with the city for paid family leave for the past two years, but with little luck.

“They’ll meet and they’ll hem and haw,” he said. “I’m angry and we’re just going to go after it right now.”

Last week, de Blasio said he was “hopeful we’ll get somewhere pretty soon” in the negotiations, according to NY1’s Lindsey Christ.

Monica Disare contributed to this report. 

School Finance

Indianapolis Public Schools sold a temple and bottle plant recently, but the sale of Broad Ripple is more controversial

PHOTO: Dylan Peers McCoy
Phillips Temple

When retired teacher Clara E. Holladay passed away in 1946, she left the school district where she taught a generous and unusual gift: Two duplex houses on the northside of Indianapolis.

Holladay’s will stipulated that the income should “assist good and worthy students, who would not, without assistance, be able to secure a high school or college education,” according to the Indianapolis Star.

Indianapolis Public Schools held on to the houses at 54th Street and North College Avenue for the next seven decades. Last year, the district sold them for $423,000. (The proceeds of the sale were invested, and the interest will continue to fund scholarships.) Between September 2015 and the end of 2018, district officials expect to have sold 10 properties and raised nearly $21 million, according to information provided by the administration.

Many sales, like Holladay’s duplexes, occur without much attention. But the district’s plan to sell the building that contained Broad Ripple High School, after closing the school this year, has drawn significant attention. And it has ignited a simmering controversy over whether the district should be forced to sell the property to a charter school, as state law currently requires, or be allowed to sell it to a developer.

But while Broad Ripple has historical and personal significance, it is one of at least four former school buildings the district has sought to sell in recent years. Over the last 50 years, enrollment in the district fell from nearly 109,000 students to 31,000. In an effort to raise money for the cash-strapped district and reduce its stockpile of underused buildings, Superintendent Lewis Ferebee’s administration has made a flurry of sales.

The money that the district raises by selling property is a short-term salve for its budget woes. But it has helped pay the bills at a time when Indianapolis Public Schools is consistently running a deficit. Next year the administration projects a deficit of about $45 million, and officials plan to ask voters to increase school funding in November.

Indianapolis Public Schools set off a real estate frenzy when it sold a former Coca-Cola bottling plant on Mass Ave. that will soon become a high-end development. The district has owned the striking art deco property since the late 1960s, using it to house a bus depot and other central services. More recently, it purchased a historic church — the Phillips Temple — in 2011, and the administration planned to demolish it to make room for a parking lot, according to the Indianapolis Star. Instead, it sold the historic property to a developer in 2015.

Here is a list of the properties the district has sold since 2015, according to the district

Property: Minnie Hartmann School 78

Buyer: John H. Boner Center

Closing Date: 9/7/2015

Sale Proceeds: $400,000

Property: Phillips Temple

Buyer: Van Rooy Properties

Closing Date: 9/17/2015

Sale Proceeds: $122,500

Property: CIRT

Buyer: Milhaus

Closing Date: 11/24/2015

Sale Proceeds: $1,100,000

Property: Florence Fay School 21

Buyer: TWG (Whitsett Group)

Closing Date: 2/26/2016

Sale Proceeds: $500,000

Property: Otis E. Brown School 20

Buyer: Tessera (Yeshua Society)

Closing Date: 7/20/2016

Sale Proceeds: $255,000

Property: College Avenue Doubles

Buyer: L. Stoeffer and Associates, Inc.

Closing Date: 12/21/2016

Sale Proceeds: $423,000

Property: SCIPS – Service Center IPS

Buyer: Bottleworks District, LLC

Closing Date: 9/1/2017

Sale Proceeds: $12,000,000

Property: Mallory/Ford

Buyer: Ford TWG, LLC

Closing Date: 11/3/2017

Sale Proceeds: $1,650,000

Property: Meridian Transition

Buyer: Families First

Closing Date: In Negotiations / July 2018

Sale Proceeds: $1,575,000

Property: FMD/Polk

Buyer: TWG Development, LLC

Closing Date: Pending Sale / December 2018

Sale Proceeds: $2,750,000

fight another day

In union defeat, lawmakers end session without revamping teacher evaluation law

After a hard-fought battle by the state teachers union, New York lawmakers went home for the summer without overhauling a controversial teacher evaluation law that ties state test scores to educator ratings.

The bill pushed by the unions would have left decisions about whether to use state test scores in teacher evaluations up to local union negotiations. While the bill cleared the Assembly, it was bottled up by the Senate’s leadership, which demanded charter school concessions in return that Assembly Democrats wouldn’t agree to.

The effort to decouple test scores from teacher evaluations was one of several that fizzled out at the end of a lackluster session characterized by lawmaker gridlock.

“Sen. Flanagan, his caucus and five Democrats chose to betray the state’s teachers,”  said New York State United Teachers President Andy Pallotta in a statement. “Make no mistake, New York teachers, parents and public school students will remember which senators voted against their public schools when we head to the polls this September and again in November.”

There is some possibility that lawmakers could return to finish a few unresolved issues this summer, but Pallotta told Chalkbeat he is not holding out hope for that outcome.

The lack of action is a defeat for the state teachers union, which fought hard for the bill since the beginning of the session. Union officials have staged musical rallies, bought balloons, rented a truck with a message urging lawmakers to pass the bill, and capped off the last day of session handing out ice cream for the cause.

However, the legislative loss gives the union something to rally around during this fall’s elections. Also, other education advocacy organizations are content to engage in a longer process to revamp evaluations.

“Inaction isn’t always the worst outcome,” said Julie Marlette, Director of Governmental Relations for the New York State School Boards Association.“Now we can continue to work with both legislative and regulatory figures to hopefully craft an update to evaluations that is thoughtful and comprehensive and includes all the stakeholders.”  

The news also means that New York’s teacher evaluation saga which has been raging for eight years will spill over into at least next year. Policymakers have been battling about state teacher evaluations since 2010, when New York adopted a system that started using state test scores to rate teachers in order to win federal “Race to the Top” money.

Teacher evaluations were altered again in 2015 when Gov. Andrew Cuomo called for a more stringent evaluation system, saying evaluations as they existed were “baloney.” The new system was met with resistance from the teachers unions and parents across the state. Nearly one in five families boycotted state tests in response to evaluation changes and a handful of other education policies.

The state’s Board of Regents acted quickly, passing a moratorium on the use of grades three to eight math and English tests in teacher evaluations. But the original 2015 law remains on the books. It was a central plank in that law which could require as much as half of an educator’s evaluation to be based on test scores that the unions targeted during this session.

With the moratorium set to expire in 2019, the fight over teacher evaluations will likely become more pressing next year. It may also allow the state education department to play a greater role in shaping the final product. State education department officials had begun to lay out a longer roadmap for redesigning teacher evaluations that involved surveys and workgroups, but the legislative battle threatened to short-circuit their process.

Now officials at the state education department say they will restart their work and pointed out that they could extend the moratorium to provide extra time if needed.

“We will resume the work we started earlier this year to engage teachers, principals and others as we seek input in moving toward developing a new educator evaluation system,” said state education department spokeswoman Emily DeSantis.

For some education advocates, slowing down the process sounds like a good idea.

“Our reaction on the NYSUT Assembly teacher evaluation bill is that you could do worse but that you could also do better and that we should take time to try,” said Bob Lowry, deputy director of the New York State Council of School Superintendents.

What seems to be a setback for the union now may be a galvanizing force during elections this fall. Republican lawmakers will likely struggle to keep control of the state Senate, and NYSUT is promising to use this inaction against them. That could be particularly consequential in Long Island, which is a hotbed of the testing opt-out movement.

It’s unclear whether the failure to act will also prove problematic for Cuomo, who is also seeking re-election. Cuomo, who pushed for the 2015 law the unions despise, is facing competition from the left in gubernatorial challenger Cynthia Nixon.

But at least so far, it seems like the union is reserving the blame for Senate Republicans and not for the governor.

Cuomo is “making it clear that he has heard the outcry,” said Pallotta. “I blame Senator Flanagan, I blame his conference and I blame 5 [Senate] Democrats.”