help wanted

Mayor de Blasio wants New York City’s next schools chief to be like Fariña — but finding a replacement won’t be easy

PHOTO: Rob Bennett, mayoral photography office
Chancellor Fariña and Mayor de Blasio at Queens' P.S. 239.

When Mayor Bill de Blasio announced a search for a new schools chief, he said he would look for someone very much like retiring schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña. But as the search intensifies, that approach could pose a dilemma for the mayor, and make it harder to find someone well-suited to running and improving a system that sees itself as a model for school districts across the country.

On the one hand, the search for someone in Fariña’s mold would make the position ideal for a proven leader from within the department. But some observers said there is a dearth of internal options, and that few of Fariña’s deputies have the right background or public persona to take on the role.

At the same time, looking outside the education department could present its own challenges, especially if the job will emphasize carrying out an existing agenda rather than encourage making key changes to a system that has made some incremental gains in recent years but still faces big inequities.

“If you’re just going to keep the trains running on time that’s not going to be a huge incentive to run an education system, even if it’s New York City,” said Josh Starr, a former schools superintendent in Connecticut and Maryland who was considered for the job four years ago. “The best person is probably someone who’s been a lifer in the [education department] who they trust.”

The appeal of running America’s largest school system — which is by itself the size of a large city — might seem obvious. It represents a chance to shape education policy in the national spotlight under a mayor who has shown an interest in ambitious education programs, including the widely-praised launch of free prekindergarten for every family.

But candidates might also be dissuaded by an arrangement where most major policy initiatives in recent years have been handed down from City Hall, there is a relatively short time frame to implement changes, and a job description that suggests the next chancellor will be tasked with continuing the existing blueprint rather than making his or her own mark.

Meanwhile, the next chancellor will have to tackle difficult problems that the current administration has struggled to address: how to serve a growing number of homeless students, yawning achievement gaps, and persistent requests from charter schools for more space to operate. On top of that, whoever takes the job might have less funding to tackle those issues.

“We’re in for some really horrible budget times with the new tax law and there’s going to be a lot of pressure on Washington to cut budgets,” said Clara Hemphill, director of education policy and Insideschools at the New School’s Center for New York City Affairs.

Still, whoever lands the job will inherit a school system that has enjoyed relative stability and progress: Test scores and graduation rates have incrementally climbed, and perhaps the mayor’s most ambitious education initiative — universal pre-K — has been widely hailed as a success. The relative calm means the next chancellor will be taking over a system many consider to be on the right track, though that could complicate efforts push through more ambitious — and potentially risky — changes.

In many ways, that legacy is exactly what de Blasio wanted from Fariña. In contrast with former Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who tried to systematically disrupt the system, Fariña was brought in to rebuild trust with educators and lend a steady hand. Some observers say she accomplished that mission — conducting legendary school visits to gauge the system’s health instead of leaning on reams of data, repairing the department’s relationship with the teachers union, and focusing on small-bore policies to encourage collaboration rather than competition between schools and educators.

But critics say the administration has never articulated a clear vision for improving the system as a whole, refused to tackle key equity issues like school segregation head on, and struggled with an expensive program to improve low-performing schools that has at best achieved mixed results — challenges a new chancellor must contend with.

Another legacy, some observers said, is that Fariña has not set up a natural successor. The New School’s Hemphill said that few of the department’s top deputies — including Dorita Gibson, Fariña’s second in command — have the visibility or political savvy to take on the job. And Josh Wallack, the deputy who helped execute the mayor’s signature pre-K expansion, does not meet de Blasio’s requirement that the chancellor must be an educator.

Finding an outsider to take the post could present challenges of its own. Not only is the chancellor’s salary is relatively low compared with some other school systems, which could give pause to the head of a higher-paying district, but also City Hall has engineered many of this administration’s high-profile education efforts.

Pedro Noguera, a UCLA professor who was reportedly floated for the role, said that the administration’s lack of a unifying vision for the system dissuaded him from considering the position.

“The items on their broad list – I have no objection to those,” he said in an interview. “But I don’t think they add up to the strategy that the system needs.” (Noguera said he was contacted by a third party about the job, but not directly by city officials.)

Still, many observers are optimistic about the mayor’s odds of fielding strong candidates. Fariña’s predecessor, Dennis Walcott, said running the nation’s largest school system will be difficult to resist — and there’s plenty of time for the next chancellor to make their mark.

“The person will be in charge of the largest municipal agency in the country,” he said. “The mayor is term limited, but he has a long four years in front of him.”

The New Chancellor

Tell us: What should the new chancellor, Richard Carranza, know about New York City schools?

PHOTO: Christina Veiga
A student at P.S. 69 Journey Prep in the Bronx paints a picture. The school uses a Reggio Emilia approach and is in the city's Showcase Schools program.

In a few short weeks, Richard Carranza will take over the nation’s largest school system as chancellor of New York City’s public schools.

Carranza, who has never before worked east of the Mississippi, will have to get up to speed quickly on a new city with unfamiliar challenges. The best people to guide him in this endeavor: New Yorkers who understand the city in its complexity.

So we want to hear from you: What does Carranza need to know about the city, its schools, and you to help him as he gets started April 2. Please fill out the survey below; we’ll collect your responses and share them with our readers and Carranza himself.

The deadline is March 23.

buses or bust?

Mayor Duggan says bus plan encourages cooperation. Detroit school board committee wants more details.

PHOTO: Denver Post file
Fourth-graders Kintan Surghani, left, and Rachel Anderson laugh out the school bus window at Mitchell Elementary School in Golden.

Detroit’s school superintendent is asking for more information about the mayor’s initiative to create a joint bus route for charter and district students after realizing the costs could be higher than the district anticipated.

District Superintendent Nikolai Vitti told a school board subcommittee Friday that he thought the original cost to the district was estimated to be around $25,000 total. Instead, he said it could cost the district roughly between $75,000 and a maximum of $125,000 for their five schools on the loop.

“I think there was a misunderstanding….” Vitti said. “I think this needs a deeper review…The understanding was that it would be $25,000 for all schools. Now, there are ongoing conversations about it being $15,000 to $25,000 for each individual school.”

The bus loop connecting charter and district schools was announced earlier this month by Mayor Mike Duggan as a way to draw kids back from the suburbs.

Duggan’s bus loop proposal is based on one that operates in Denver that would travel a circuit in certain neighborhoods, picking up students on designated street corners and dropping them off at both district and charter schools.

The bus routes — which Duggan said would be funded by philanthropy, the schools and the city — could even service afterschool programs that the schools on the bus route could work together to create.

In concept, the finance committee was not opposed to the idea. But despite two-thirds of the cost being covered and splitting the remaining third with charters, they were worried enough about the increased costs that they voted not to recommend approval of the agreement to the full board.  

Vitti said when he saw the draft plan, the higher price made him question whether the loop would be worth it.

“If it was $25,000, it would be an easier decision,” he said.

To better understand the costs and benefits and to ultimately decide, Vitti said he needs more data, which will take a few weeks. 

Alexis Wiley, Duggan’s chief of staff, said the district’s hesitation was a sign they were performing their due diligence before agreeing to the plan.

“I’m not at all deterred by this,” Wiley said. She said the district, charters, and city officials have met twice, and are “working in the same direction, so that we eliminate as many barriers as we can.”

Duggan told a crowd earlier this month at the State of the City address that the bus loop was an effort to grab the city’s children – some 32,500 – back from suburban schools.

Transportation is often cited as one of the reasons children leave the city’s schools and go to other districts, and charter leaders have said they support the bus loop because they believe it will make it easier for students to attend their schools.

But some board members had doubts that the bus loop would be enough to bring those kids back, and were concerned about giving charters an advantage in their competition against the district to increase enrollment.

“I don’t know if transportation would be why these parents send their kids outside of the district,” Angelique Peterson-Mayberry said. “If we could find out some of the reasons why, it would add to the validity” of implementing the bus loop.

Board member LaMar Lemmons echoed other members’ concerns on the impact of the transportation plan, and said many parents left the district because of the poor quality of schools under emergency management, not transportation.

“All those years in emergency management, that drove parents to seek alternatives, as well as charters,” he said. “I’m hesitant to form an unholy alliance with the charters for something like this.”