School suspensions dropped significantly last school year, more than erasing a bump the year before, education department officials announced Friday.

In all, schools issued 32,801 suspensions during the 2018-19 school year, a 10.5% decline compared with the year before. Mayor Bill de Blasio has prioritized a raft of reforms designed to curb the use of punitive disciplinary measures. In the past five years, suspensions have declined 39%.

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Aggregate suspension numbers tell only part of the story, though, especially since suspensions are not handed out evenly across schools. Here you can find suspension numbers for every city public school for the past two years.

The numbers combine superintendent suspensions, which are issued for serious offenses and can last up to a year, as well as principal suspensions, which are issued for more minor infractions and typically last fewer than six days. (City officials recently limited most suspensions to 20 days.)

Any field marked “redacted” means a school had somewhere between two and 10 suspensions. If a number has an asterisk, that means part of the school’s data was redacted and could be off by as many as five suspensions. The data also excludes charter schools.