Headlines

Rise & Shine: At long last, city agrees to revised role of police in schools

Good morning!

Today we bring you news that's been more than a decade in the making: The city has reached a new agreement governing how police interact with students in schools. The Memorandum of Understanding, or MOU, hadn't been updated since the Giuliani era, when zero-tolerance discipline policies were the norm.

Also in today's roundup, Politico reports on a new analysis that shows GPA and state test scores are better predictors of students success than the Specialized High Schools Admissions Test. And we have a list of the first cohort of schools recognized for stellar performance under the state's new accountability rules.

— Christina Veiga, reporter

LONG WAIT After three years of negotiations, the education department finally released a new agreement governing how police interact with students in schools. Chalkbeat

TALKING SHSAT An analysis by the city’s education department found that GPA and state test scores are more accurate predictors than the Specialized High Schools Admissions Test for determining how well students will perform at the elite schools at the center of an integration debate. Politico

HIGH ACHIEVERS The state released a list of more than 200 schools in New York City that have excelled under new accountability measures. Chalkbeat

ON A BOAT A classroom on a boat allows students to learn about marine life in Jamaica Bay. Wall Street Journal

G&T VOTE Parents at P.S. 9 in Brooklyn want to end the school’s gifted and talented program to promote integration. NY1

DIGGING IN Some city council members are calling for an investigation after an education department employee sent an email to members of a school diversity work group asking them to “please join” a rally in support of schools Chancellor Richard Carranza. New York Post

HATE SPEECH Police are looking for a man who they say vandalized elementary schools with Islamaphobic messages. New York Post

EAT YOUR VEGGIES Staten Island schools are expanding programs to give students access to healthy foods. Staten Island Advance