It's not just the classroom

Disparities persist in how Memphis schools contract with businesses, study shows

PHOTO: Brad Vest/The Commercial Appeal
Bricklayers from TopCat Masonry Contractors LLC work on an apartment complex in downtown Memphis in 2014.

Although black-owned businesses make up more than a third of the local construction industry, they were awarded less than 1 percent of Memphis school contracts in the last five years, according to a new study.

That’s the most egregious finding from a consulting group commissioned by the school board last year to measure disparities in how Shelby County Schools does business — particularly with companies owned by white women and people of color.

The study, presented Tuesday to school board members, recommends that the district create an outreach program to try to close that gap. If the board adopts the findings next week as expected, such an initiative could be the next step.

The study highlights an equity issue in a district that’s focused more typically on eliminating inequities in the education of children. But as Tennessee’s largest school system, Memphis’ fifth largest employer, and the overseer of a $1 billion budget, Shelby County Schools has an obligation to manage its business dealings in an equitable fashion, too, said Shante Avant, chairwoman of the school board.

“Wherever there are inequities, whether it’s academics or where we spend money, … all those are part of how we improve our city,” Avant told Chalkbeat ahead of the report’s release.

Specifically, the study compared the percent of businesses owned by white women and people of color who are “willing and able” to do work for the school district to the amount of money spent with those businesses from 2011 to 2016.

Here’s a quick summary. (For a more detailed chart, scroll to the bottom of this page.)

Business owners interviewed by researchers identified several barriers encountered when attempting to work with the district. Almost half cited competing with large firms as the biggest concern. (Nationwide, only 4 percent of black-owned businesses have more than one employee.)

The district commissioned the study last fall from MGT Consulting Group based in Tallahassee, Florida, under a $254,000 contract. The group reports completing more than 200 such studies, including one in 2012 for the Memphis utility company.

In anticipation of the findings, Shelby County Schools recently hired Brenda Allen as its procurement director to spearhead efforts to close the gap. In addition to recommending the new initiative, the study recommends hiring three more people under Allen to assist with “outreach, reporting, and monitoring” to increase contracts with businesses owned by white women and people of color.

The consultant said the district’s procurement team should “document their outreach efforts and the reasons why they may have rejected qualified” businesses.

The findings reflect disparities countywide. More than half of Memphis businesses are black-owned, but generate less than 1 percent of the city’s business revenue, according to the 2012 U.S. Census of Small Business Owners. Five years earlier, the number was closer to 2 percent. And similar gaps in county government spending were found in a 2016 study.

High Ground News: Memphis pushes to level the playing field for black entrepreneurs

The report commended the leadership of Shelby County Schools for its desire to decrease disparities in business contracts after years of inattention to the issue — and relatively soon after the 2013 merger of city and county schools.

You can read the full report here.

Want to learn more? Join High Ground News, Chalkbeat Tennessee and MLK50: Justice Through Journalism on Jan. 25 for “Show Mem The Money: The Education Edition,” a conversation with Memphis education leaders about how the business of education can be an economic driver for women- and black-owned businesses as one of the city’s largest employers.

Indiana's 2018 legislative session

Indiana lawmakers OK up to $100 million to address funding shortage for schools

PHOTO: Scott Elliott

Indiana lawmakers agreed to dip into reserves to make up a shortfall to get public schools the money they were promised — and they’re trying to make sure it doesn’t happen again.

Both the House and Senate overwhelmingly voted to approve the final plan in House Bill 1001. The bill now heads to Gov. Eric Holcomb’s desk.

Rep. Tim Brown, a co-author of the bill and chairman of the House Ways & Means Committee, said it was necessary to take the uncommon step and have the state to use reserve funds to make up the gap, but in the next budget year making up that difference will be a priority. Brown said he, other lawmakers, and the Legislative Services Agency will work to make sure projections are more accurate going forward.

“Do procedures need to be changed?” Brown said. “We’re going to be asking those questions” during the next budget cycle.

Estimates on the size of the shortfall have ranged widely this year, beginning around $9 million and growing as new information and student counts came in. Projections from the Legislative Services Agency reported by the Indianapolis Star had the gap at $22 million this year and almost $60 million next year.

The final bill requires the state to transfer money from reserves if public school enrollment is higher than expected, as well as to make up any shortages for students with disabilities or students pursuing career and technical education. The state budget director would have to sign off first. Transfers from reserves are already allowed if more voucher students enroll in private schools than projected, or if state revenue is less than expected.

The budget shortfall, discovered late last year, resulted from miscalculations in how many students were expected to attend public schools over the next two years. Lawmakers proposed two bills to address the shortfall, and the House made it its highest legislative priority. The compromise bill would set aside up to $25 million for this year and up to $75 million next year. The money would be transferred from reserve funds to the state general fund and then distributed to districts.

The bill also takes into account two other programs that lawmakers think could be contributing to underestimated public school enrollment: virtual education programs and kids who repeat kindergarten.

District-based virtual education programs would be required to report to the state by October of each year on virtual program enrollment, total district enrollment, what grades the virtual students are in, where they live, and how much of their day is spent in a virtual learning program. These programs, unlike virtual charter schools, are not separate schools, so it can be hard for state officials and the public to know they even exist.

The report will help lawmakers understand how the programs are growing and how much they might cost, but it won’t include information about whether students in the programs are learning or graduating. Virtual charter schools in the state have typically posted poor academic results, and Holcomb has called for more information and action, though legislative efforts have failed.

Finally, the bill changes how kindergarteners are counted for state funding. The state changed the cut-off age for kindergarten to 5 years old by Aug. 1 — if students are younger than that, they can still enroll, but the district won’t receive state dollars for them. Some districts were allowing 4-year-olds to enroll in kindergarten early, Sen. Ryan Mishler said earlier this month. Then those same students would enroll in kindergarten again the next year.

Despite increases passed last year to boost the total education budget, many school leaders have said they struggle to pay salaries and maintain buildings, which is why funding shortfalls — even small ones — matter. This year’s unexpected shortfall was particularly problematic because districts had already made plans based on the state budget.

Find all of Chalkbeat’s 2018 legislative coverage here.

let the games begin

Assembly pushes for $1.5 billion boost to education spending

PHOTO: Photo by Jonathan Fickies for UFT
UFT President Michael Mulgrew interviews New York State Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie.

In a tight budget year, New York State’s Democratic-led Assembly wants to increase education spending by $1.5 billion, officials announced late Monday night.

The proposed increase  which would bring total education spending to $27.1 billion  is significantly more than the governor’s suggested $769 million increase. Still, the amount is a slightly smaller boost than the Assembly backed last year, which is likely a reflection of a difficult fiscal situation faced by the state this year.

State officials are fighting against a budget deficit, a federal tax plan that could harm New York, and the threat of further federal cuts. The potential lack of funding could be the only sticking point in an otherwise quiet budget year for education matters.

As part of its education agenda, the Assembly backed a number of programs it has in the past. The plan supports the My Brother’s Keeper initiative, which is designed to help boys and young men of color reach their potential, and “community schools,” which act as service hubs that provide healthcare and afterschool programs.

The release of this plan kicks off the final stretch of the state’s budget process. The governor has already outlined his proposals and the Senate will likely follow soon, setting up the state’s annual last-minute haggling.

The budget is due by April 1, but could always be resolved later similar to last year.