About 40 percent of Tennessee’s school systems are opting to expand online testing beyond high schoolers this month when they begin administering the state’s standardized test.

For the first time, all high school students will take TNReady online when the three-week testing window opens on April 16, but the State Department of Education is giving districts the option of including grades 5-8, too.

It’s all part of Tennessee’s game plan to transition gradually to digital testing following its failed statewide switch in 2016, the first year of TNReady. Next year, all middle schoolers will test online.

Districts opting in this year are not necessarily testing all students in their middle grades, state spokeswoman Sara Gast said.

Districts could opt into online for as little as a single school and grade-level combination or as much as the entirety of their students in grades 5-8 districtwide,” Gast said Thursday.

Here are the 59 school systems opting in:

  • Anderson County
  • Athens
  • Bartlett
  • Bedford County
  • Bledsoe County
  • Bradley County
  • Bristol
  • Cannon County
  • Cheatham County
  • Cleveland
  • Cocke County
  • Coffee County
  • Collierville
  • Cumberland County
  • Dyer County
  • Fentress County
  • Franklin County
  • Giles County
  • Greene County
  • Grundy County
  • Hancock County
  • Haywood County
  • Houston County
  • Humphreys County
  • Jackson County
  • Jefferson County
  • Johnson City
  • Kingsport
  • Knox County
  • Lakeland
  • Lawrence County
  • Lebanon
  • Lenoir City
  • Loudon County
  • Madison County
  • Maryville
  • McMinn County
  • Moore County
  • Morgan County
  • Newport
  • Oak Ridge
  • Polk County
  • Putnam County
  • Richard City
  • Roane County
  • Rutherford County
  • Scott County
  • Smith County
  • South Carroll
  • Stewart County
  • Sullivan County
  • Sumner County
  • Tennessee School for the Deaf
  • Trousdale County
  • Van Buren County
  • Washington County
  • White County
  • Williamson County
  • Wilson County