• In the “credit recovery” courses that are propping up Los Angeles’s graduation rate, there’s a wide gap between what work could be required and what is. (L.A. Times)
  • One response to the Brown v. Board of Education decision in 1954 was the creation of a news service just about segregation. (Alabama School Connection)
  • Could Massachusetts be heading for a Common Corexit? Backers of a referendum to recall the standards say they have enough support to require a vote. (NECN)
  • Education envy is shifting from Finland to Estonia, a smaller and even less diverse country two hours away where few students score low on international exams. (Hechinger Report)
  • Remember Rocketship, the charter network that was going to bring personalized learning to a million kids? It scaled back its goals by nearly 100 percent. (NPRed)
  • The head of the Chan Zuckerberg Foundation’s education division found inspiration for pushing personalized learning in Memphis. (Facebook)
  • Where the Silicon Valley-driven “personalized learning spectrum” came from and what it looks like in practice. (Larry Cuban)
  • Only 8 percent of New York City teachers are men of color. A new initiative aims to change that. (Chalkbeat)
  • Across America, there’s a big gap in principal demographics, too. (The Atlantic)
  • A personal story about the lasting impact of having teachers who look like their students, from the daughter of one Detroit’s only black male teachers in the 1970s. (Washington Post)
  • Get to know Chicago’s longest-serving teacher, who has been at his school for half a century. (WGN)
  • San Francisco took the unusual step of no longer offering algebra to middle schoolers. Here’s why. (Priceonomics)
  • Kids in one Australia school can play with toy guns — as long as they have a license. (Joanne Jacobs)