charter school parents

pushing back

New York

Charter parents' inclusion call yields a bill but not city support

Charter Parent Action Network Director Valerie Babb addresses charter school parents and students in Albany. (Photo courtesy of the New York City Charter School Center) An annual caravan of charter school parents to Albany took place today with a specific mission: convince legislators to approve a bill allowing charter parents to run for the city's local parent councils. It's a battle that charter advocates will have to fight without the Department of Education's help. The city has never supported allowing charter parents to run for parent councils, even as it has encouraged the proliferation of charter schools and allowed them to operate in district space. State law requires that each school district in the city field an elected parent council, known as a Community Education Council, to provide an avenue for parents to weigh in on schools policy. Some of the council's duties, such as presiding over public hearings about co-locations, involve charter school issues. But the Bloomberg administration has constrained the councils' authority and their only statutory function is to redraw school zone lines, which do not affect charter schools. They do not actually approve or reject co-locations. Still, the CECs are seen as one of the few formal venues for parents to voice opinions about department policies, and charter school parents see the exclusion as an equity issue. They have convinced two legislators — Assemblyman Peter Rivera, a Bronx Democrat, and State Sen. Marty Golden, a Republican from Brooklyn — to introduce a bill that would reserve one of the 11 seats on each council for a charter parent. "In order to protect our children and their continued access to a great public education, charter parents need and deserve a seat at the table to help inform the decisions about the schools in their neighborhoods," said Valerie Babb, director of the Charter Parents Action Network, in a statement. "By supporting this legislation, our lawmakers will send a strong signal to families that their voices carry just as much weight as other public school parents in their districts."