Colorado Growth Model

Growing pains

Growing pains

New York

City to release progress reports with new formula, lower grades

Tomorrow, when the city releases its progress reports for elementary and middle schools, parents will begin the annual rite of deciphering their schools' report cards. But this year the tradition will be complicated by a new formula and, for many schools, lower grades. The city is trying to accomplish several goals at once: It is hoping to improve the methods it uses to measure student progress and reduce the wild fluctuation and inflation of grades that has marked past years' progress reports. At the same time, city officials hope to convince parents, teachers and principals that the grades are meaningful, especially in light of this year's sharp drop in test scores across the city. Last year, the city gave 84 percent of elementary and middle schools A’s, while 13 percent received a B, and 2 percent received a C. Just five schools were given D’s, and two were given F’s. Those grades were much higher than the year before, when 38 percent of schools were given an A. In 2007, when the reports were first issued, 23 percent received that rating. For this year's progress reports, the city is making several big changes to how the grades are calculated. First, it is modifying how the city calculates students' progress. In the past, a significant percentage of a school's grade  — 85 percent for elementary and middle schools — was based on student performance on state math and reading scores. So when test scores went up throughout the city in 2009 (reflecting a statewide trend), the grades soared on progress reports. This year the city is doing something different. It is comparing the progress of each student to other students who began the school year performing at the same level.