district 3

sorting the students

Compare and Contrast

The big sort

late addition

petition watch

First Person

tweet talk

a primer

going viral

making plans

Election 2017

Fresh Start

Great Divide

making plans

losing ground

on the move

BIG PICTURE

Not over

done deal

letter wars

Rezoning debate

Achieving Diversity

New proposal

MERGE AHEAD

Achieving Diversity

Rezoning battle

Dividing Lines

hello from the other side

fighting words

sorting the students

sorting the students

A tale of two schools

New York

A protest as hundreds of kindergarten hopefuls sit on waiting lists

Parents and elected officials gathered at City Hall today to protest crowding in Manhattan that has led to long waiting lists for public school kindergartens. (GothamSchools ##http://www.flickr.com/photos/28995913@N07/3508423223/##Flickr##) A crowd of shell-shocked parents gathered outside City Hall this afternoon, angry that the Department of Education hasn’t found seats for the hundreds of rising kindergarten students who have been placed on waiting lists for next year at their local public schools. The waiting lists, which include 273 names in just two Manhattan districts, mean that families in baby- and building-boom areas like the Upper East Side, the Upper West Side, and Greenwich Village could find themselves unable to secure a spot at their neighborhood school's kindergarten. The lists attracted extra attention yesterday after news leaked that the city was considering closing or relocating prekindergarten classes at two Greenwich Village elementary schools, PS 3 and PS 41, in order to make room for kindergartners. Parents at the rally said they felt confused and powerless. "As far as I can tell, I don't have a Plan B — other than home school or moving to Jersey," said Jay Douglas, whose 4-year-old son is number 42 on a waiting list for PS 187 in Washington Heights. Elected officials joined the parents at City Hall today to criticize city officials for not planning ahead to meet the demand for spots in public schools. Scott Stringer, Manhattan's borough president, said the DOE is "closing its eyes" to a widespread capacity problem, warning that taxpaying parents will pack up and move, taking their kids and tax dollars somewhere else if they can't enroll in their local public school.
New York

Despite a rally and walkout, UWS parent council votes to rezone

New York

CEC 3 to DOE: On rezoning, try, try again

Two weeks after the DOE first presented the Community Education Council for District 3 with two proposals for rezoning the Upper West Side, CEC 3 has concluded that both are too flawed to vote on. Maps of the DOE's two rezoning proposals In its official response, which CEC 3 released Friday along with responses from individual schools, CEC 3 asks for a new plan based on official school capacity data, a revised conception of school zones, and an expectation of class size reduction. The densely packed response also asks the DOE to consider leasing as a short-term solution to the district's space needs and emphasizes the unique identities of the district's special programs, the advantages of grandfathering in any new zones so that siblings are kept together, and the need for a new school building. An important question, the CEC argues, is whether the time is even right for rezoning, given the DOE's own self-proclaimed constraints in planning for future space needs. From the response: You have said that DOE does not plan for children until they register for seats. If the DOE is unable to anticipate how many children will be yielded by new construction, then perhaps this period of massive new construction in our district is NOT the best time to be redrawing zone lines. The council will address the issue further at its public meeting Wednesday. CEC 3's entire response is worth a read — it's a useful summary of many of the issues districts and neighborhoods face when trying to negotiate an overcrowding plan with the DOE. The response is posted in full after the jump.