war of attrition

war of attrition

New York

Report: Districts can do more to retain their strongest teachers

In New York City — "District D" — there was virtually no difference in turnover rates based on teacher performance. Getting rid of weak teachers doesn't always require massive policy changes. Sometimes all it takes is a nudge, a new study on teacher turnover suggests. When New York City principals told low-rated teachers that they were deficient, the teachers were three times more likely to leave the school, according to the study, released today by TNTP, a group that advocates for aggressive changes to hiring and firing practices in public schools. Convincing the best teachers to stay is just as easy as counseling the weak ones out, the study suggests. Top-rated teachers said they were more likely to stay if their principals gave them more constructive feedback and more public recognition for their efforts, but two-thirds of them reported that their principals did not even encourage them to return to their school. The study is a follow-up to TNTP's 2009 influential "Widget Effect" report, which urged school districts to revamp teacher evaluations. In the new report, the group focuses on how districts can hold on to teachers determined to be the best. Districts don't make a special effort to keep those teachers, termed "Irreplaceables" in the report, and when they leave, schools are highly unlikely to hire teachers who are anywhere near as strong, the report concludes. Some of the report's findings represent low-cost, easy-to-implement alternatives to some of the other policies TNTP has pushed, including firing teachers who don't have permanent positions and doing away with seniority-based layoffs.
New York

Walcott: Projected $64 million cut to schools only temporary

Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott repeated a promise not to touch principals' budgets next year, saying that a proposed cut in school funding that would cost the city more than 1,100 teaching positions would likely disappear once the city finalizes its budget later this spring. Of the 5,000 teachers who typically leave the system each year, the preliminary 2013 budget projects that only about 4,000 would be replaced, which would save about $64 million, according to the city's preliminary budget . But Walcott said that funding would likely be restored in time for the final budget and that principals would be able to hire for any vacated positions. City Council members pestered Walcott about that and much more at a hearing this afternoon on the agency’s $19.6 billion budget, a 1 percent increase that won't cover the added expenses the department expects. While last year’s hearings focused almost solely on opposition to a proposal to layoff thousands of teachers, the concerns raised by elected officials today spanned a range of the city's education policies, including increased class sizes, the small schools initiative, spending on technology and contracts, and Medicaid collection. But they reserved most of their early criticism on the $64 million cut in areas that directly fund schools. The decreased sum represents a headcount reduction of 1,117 teacher positions, according to the city's projections. “Year after year the DOE has made cuts to school budgets,” said Education Committee Chair Robert Jackson. “How are schools supposed to make do next year given the loss of funding proposed in the budget?”